writing advice

Stop Comparing Yourself

How to Be Happy as a Writer

This week, let’s make ourselves a pact. I’ll stop comparing myself to other writers – and so will you.

Learning From Those Who Came Before

We write our stories, and we do the best we can. For many of us, that means we write from perspective born of backgrounds we didn’t control, educations we weren’t aware were cheap, and information we didn’t know was dated.

Stop Thinking About Marketing

The reason we feel the need to hold baby creations up to some 30-year pro’s for comparison is because our culture teaches us to judge all art according to salability – but salability is not the point of art.

Writing Fatigue (and what to do about it)

This month is not about producing something publishable. It’s about teaching yourself to just keep writing, to ignore the inner editor, and to let yourself just spill words onto the page.

Patience is a long, long road

Your Trajectory Is Not Fixed

Here’s a lie I’ll bet you’ve been told: “You have to figure out what you want to do before it’s too late.”

Location as a character

Location As a Character

Your location affects your other characters and plot every bit as much as your protagonist, antagonist, awesome sidekicks, eponymous heroes, or sarcastic love-interests.

Only You Can Tell Your Story

No One Can Tell Your Story But You

Writing is a strange thing, filled with emotional roller-coasters and storms and deserts. Who would ever put themselves willingly through this? Well, you (and me). Why? Because you have something to say. The only person who can tell your story is you.

Typewriter

Why You Need to Write What Scares You

What would you write if you knew you couldn’t fail? I promise I’m not setting you up for failure. There is a very good reason I’m asking this question.

How do villains justify THAT?

How Did They Justify THAT?

Why does this matter? Because if you’re not writing your villains with the awareness that in their head, they’re not the villain, you may be writing a flat, 2D character.

How to Make Third-Person Perspective More Personal

Having trouble making your characters seem less distant? This will help.

This tip is nifty. This tip is seriously, unrepentantly nifty. To make your third-person point of view sound more personal, you have to remove the filter words.

Dealing With the Word “No”

Each time you get a “no,” it can really feel like that was it – the end. You will get another chance. I’m going to share two really simple (though challenging) things that kept me going through all the “no’s,” until I finally had my “yes.”

Scroll to Top